WhooshMail

WhooshMail is a fictional email marketing service. For this case study, I created an intuitive task flow for a business-to-business client who was looking to improve their email campaigns. After designing and testing wireframes to determine their strengths and weaknesses, I put the finishing touches on the flow by adding color and other visual design elements. Lastly, I prepared a presentation for stakeholders to show and explain my work.

Overview

Project Statement

Clients who feel eager to expand their reach to customers need to send marketing emails, but feel frustrated by the complicated flows of competing email marketing companies.

Business Goals

  • Increase the first month retention by 20%
  • Increase daily active users by 10%
  • Increase campaigns sent by 20%

Assumptions

  • Users are interested in a simple, easy way to send marketing emails
  • Users want something that is cost-effective
  • Users would like to have access to see how well their emails are doing with their customers

Target Audience

Admin:

  • Mostly ages 40-60
  • Primarily based in the United States
  • Small business owners
  • High School/GED or Bachelor’s degree
  • Ready to be their own boss
  • Pursuing their passions
  • Used their personal funds to get started

Basic:

  • Mostly ages 20-40
  • Primarily based in the United States
  • Work for a small business
  • High School/GED

User Personas

User Personas

The first step in this process was to create user personas. I created two personas; an admin and a basic user. This step helped me learn to empathize with the target audience and that you cannot design for your user without understanding them.

User persona example of an admin user. Includes a generic picture
User persona example of an basic user.

Storyboards

Storyboards

I created storyboards to showcase how I imagined the client would discover WhooshMail. This exercise taught me how to better empathize with my target user and figure out where their desire for an email marketing service stemmed from.

User persona example of an admin user. Includes a generic picture
User persona example of an basic user.

Competitive Analysis

Competitive Analysis

I performed a competitive benchmark and learned how to create a service that competes with others by taking note of what they offer, what they lack, and gaining ideas for concepts I could experiment with in my own design. This helped me decide which features are needed in a service like this. I specialize in design, not email marketing services, so learning about them and what the competitors offer benefited me a great deal when working on this case study.

MailChimp

Features:
  • Email templates
  • A/B testing
  • Marketing CRM
  • Multi-step journeys
  • Send Time Optimization
  • Behavioral Targeting
Notes:

MailChimp has extended their features much further than just an email marketing service. As a small business owner who is only looking for an email marketing service, I feel that this can be overwhelming.

Having a ‘101’ page that explains their products as well as a ‘Guide & Tutorial’ page can be beneficial for their customers. This could be a good idea to include in my design, providing small business owners detailed information on advanced features

emma

Features:
  • Email template gallery
  • A/B testing
  • Real-time reporting and analytics
  • API access
  • Segmentation tools
Notes:

This site offers webinars which can be helpful for business owners to learn tips on running a business, growing their audience, and even improving their mental health as an entrepreneur.

Sendinblue

Features:
  • Landing pages
  • CRM
  • Multi-user access
  • SMS marketing
  • Retargeting ads
  • Advanced segmentation
  • Customizable sign-up forms
Notes:

Sendinblue has an SMS marketing feature which I thought was a great idea for a way to better reach customers. However as a small business owner who isn’t really technologically savvy I feel as though that can get a little overwhelming.

Sketches

Sketches

I did four sketches for each page. The Admin and Basic services are very similar, but have different features for each step. I learned that sketching is very necessary when figuring out which design elements and features I should include. It allowed me to quickly create multiple iterations and then choose my favorite designs in each sketch and put it all into one.

Wireframes

Wireframes

Creating these wireframes taught me how to best work with a grid when designing and how to make components work well together with proper alignment and proximity usage. My skills in wireframing have grown exponentially after this case study.

Usability Tests

Usability Tests

I performed A/B testing with a total of ten participants. Five people navigated each prototype and gave me feedback to help me improve the usability of the email marketing service. I’ve never performed A/B testing until this case study, and I learned about the possibility of different outcomes you may have when testing multiple prototypes. I found that what may have worked for the admin service might not work for the basic service prototype and vice versa.

For in-depth details of the A/B testing, including the steps participants took and direct quotes while navigating the prototype, see the links below.

Overall Findings

  • Seven out of the ten total participants mentioned that the general flow of the prototype was smooth and intuitive.
  • There were many confirmations throughout the flow, so it was clear to the user what had happened when they pushed an action key.
  • A recurring issue was lack of descriptions.
  • The analytics page could use more graphs.
  • Three of the five participants for the basic prototype mentioned they liked the progress bar at the top of the flow.
  • The editing page could use adjustments so the buttons are more clear and necessary for the user.

Mockups

Mockups

After receiving feedback from the usability testing, I applied some changes to the service and created high-fidelity mockups which are shown below. Overall, this was a hefty step in the case study. I learned a lot about patience when creating these mockups, and if I find myself hyper-focusing on one small detail to step away for a little bit and return with a fresh mind. I learned to make the prototype look more like a functioning website than it did in the previous by taking away a lot of the transitions when you click on functioning elements or go to another page.

Admin:

Basic:

Below are screen recordings of the high-fidelity mockups as prototypes.

Admin:

Basic:

Presentation

Presentation

I created a presentation for stakeholders. As a reminder, this is a fictional email marketing service so the presentation was for fictional stakeholders. That doesn’t mean it wasn’t a huge learning experience for me. It taught me the importance of communicating with other teams to make sure my ideas are able to come to fruition, or if I need to tweak anything. I learned that feedback is so important because it takes a village to create a product like this and my team might bring ideas to the table that I never thought of and vice versa.

View Presentation