Grocery Prime

Grocery Prime is a fictional app I designed for a project. The goal of the project was to find a specific pain point users have when grocery shopping and solve it with this app. I created a research plan to gather feedback and data from my target audience, then analyzed the data to determine a common problem to solve within the app. Once the most common problem was clear to me, I prototyped an app and completed a usability test to gather feedback on the prototype.

Overview

Research Goals

  • Learn about users’ pain points
  • Learn the users’ goals and experiences when buying groceries
  • Learn about the users’ wants and needs so I can incorporate them into the app prototype.

Key Areas of Inquiry

  • The time dedicated to grocery shopping
  • Grocery store traffic
  • Overall cost
  • Shopping method
  • Variety of products

Target Audience

  • Adults who own a smartphone
  • People who live busy lives and don’t have a lot of time to spend at the grocery store
  • People who are cautious of the pandemic and prefer to avoid public places
  • Primarily based in the U.S.
  • People who go grocery shopping at least twice a month

User Research

User Research

Since I was creating a product from scratch, the first thing I did was figure out what my target audience actually needed in a grocery shopping app. I designed a survey and sent it to six participants to get a better understanding of their grocery shopping needs. This exercise has taught me that I shouldn’t assume what users want in a product before designing it. Prior to research, I thought the main pain point I would have to solve with this app would be the time dedicated to grocery shopping. By the end of it, I learned that the most common problem that users have is the cost of products.

View survey results

Overall Findings

  • All six participants mentioned that they are satisfied with the time it takes them to grocery shop.
  • Two out of the six were frustrated by the grocery store traffic
  • The six participants all stated that they prioritize the cheapest price over brand loyalty. I learned that this was the main problem I needed to solve with the grocery app.
  • All participants mentioned they use a list when shopping, with a pretty equal split between using a list on their phone and pen and paper. Because of this, I thought it would be a good idea to implement a list feature on the app.

Affinity Diagram

Affinity Diagram

I created an affinity diagram after I received all the responses on my survey. The purpose of this was to organize and consolidate information concerning specific issues that I found people had with grocery shopping. Creating an affinity diagram taught me how much easier it is to see what the target user wants/needs by organizing responses into different categories.

After performing research and putting together an affinity diagram, I realized the pain point that I was aiming to solve for users was the overall cost of grocery shopping. I planned to implement a feature into the app that could help resolve this issue.

Sketches

Sketches

I did 3 sketches per page. Sketching out my ideas before jumping into wireframing helped me get figure out what I should include on each page. I was able to choose my favorite elements from each sketch and put them together onto one canvas when it was time to begin wireframing.

Mockups

Mockups

I created medium-high fidelity mockups of this app. This was a fun experience because I learned that white space isn’t a bad thing, especially on a mobile app where components need to be clear and easy to understand. I learned not to clutter up the pages too much and try to put only what was necessary on each page with large buttons that would be easy to tap.

Usability Tests

Usability Tests

I asked five people to participate in my usability test. The task given to the participants was to add the most cost-effective product (in this case I used taco seasoning) to their list. Performing usability tests has been rewarding and a great learning experience. I learned that if I need to assist a participant in navigating the app, then there was most likely a design flaw. On the contrary, I learned that this was a great way to validate my design ideas in areas that were seamless and effective for the users.

View Usability Test Results

Overall Findings

  • When participants managed to add an item for a list, all of them immediately noticed the "get best price" option which completed their task.
  • Three of the five participants mentioned that having an obvious search feature on the homepage would be a good alternative to adding an item from the list screen.
  • Two out of the five participants mentioned that they liked the overall UI of the app.

Updated Prototype

Updated Prototype

After testing the app, it was clear that I needed to make an adjustment so the user has an alternative way to add items to their list. View the updated prototype below. This has taught me that just because the solution is clear to me, the designer, it’s imperative to have participants test the product and provide feedback on what did or didn’t work well.

Sitemap

Sitemap

For the final step after I made the necessary adjustments to the prototype, I created a sitemap. This step has taught me a lot about Information Architecture, how to organize an app, and why it’s important to create navigation that makes sense. Without it, the user can easily get confused and not understand how to properly navigate the app.